When it doesn't fit anywhere else
 #163220  by strumminsix
 Mon Nov 05, 2018 5:00 pm
handyandy wrote:
Mon Nov 05, 2018 1:32 pm
How can I use Audacity or similar software to isolate Bobby's guitar track?
I'm sure somebody smarter is gonna tell you about frequencies etc, to boost, it can't happen.

But the reality is that once a multi-track is bounced it can't be undone. Your best bets are to use the search or goto the Bobby section and find shows that have him front and center in the mix, Jerry Bobby panned shows, or youtubes of them playing in the studio like this one start around 31 mins:
 #163230  by old man down
 Mon Nov 05, 2018 8:42 pm
waldo041 wrote:
Mon Nov 05, 2018 6:04 pm
Damn Weir, the Audacity not to have isolated tracks!

https://archive.org/details/gd1989-09-1 ... n.flac1644

(is this considered Weir isolated by audacity?)

~waldo
We'll never hear Weir more isolated than this.

But to the original poster, if you are hoping to isolate Weir to learn his style, and you're somewhat new to guitar, go as far back in time as you can, and focus on his full chord strums, his filling in the void around Jerry.

By learning his old style, you'll "round out" your own style and follow in his footsteps, become "aged' in rhythm guitar similar to him, and understand his "motivations" as you, yourself, age with your "motivations."

Trying to learn Weir's recent work, without putting in the time to see how he has gotten there, will leave you always wondering how he comes up with his ideas, and your own style will suffer because you haven't put in the time, yourself.

It's a long strange trip, but oh so rewarding if you stay the course. It comes piece by piece, and usually only to those who have the "calling."
 #163234  by joethepainter
 Tue Nov 06, 2018 8:41 am
old man down wrote:
Mon Nov 05, 2018 8:42 pm
waldo041 wrote:
Mon Nov 05, 2018 6:04 pm
Damn Weir, the Audacity not to have isolated tracks!

https://archive.org/details/gd1989-09-1 ... n.flac1644

(is this considered Weir isolated by audacity?)

~waldo
We'll never hear Weir more isolated than this.

But to the original poster, if you are hoping to isolate Weir to learn his style, and you're somewhat new to guitar, go as far back in time as you can, and focus on his full chord strums, his filling in the void around Jerry.

By learning his old style, you'll "round out" your own style and follow in his footsteps, become "aged' in rhythm guitar similar to him, and understand his "motivations" as you, yourself, age with your "motivations."

Trying to learn Weir's recent work, without putting in the time to see how he has gotten there, will leave you always wondering how he comes up with his ideas, and your own style will suffer because you haven't put in the time, yourself.

It's a long strange trip, but oh so rewarding if you stay the course. It comes piece by piece, and usually only to those who have the "calling."
"Great post."
Really, you summed it up nicely. 8)
 #163237  by handyandy
 Tue Nov 06, 2018 2:05 pm
old man down wrote:
waldo041 wrote:
Mon Nov 05, 2018 6:04 pm
Damn Weir, the Audacity not to have isolated tracks!

https://archive.org/details/gd1989-09-1 ... n.flac1644

(is this considered Weir isolated by audacity?)

~waldo
We'll never hear Weir more isolated than this.

But to the original poster, if you are hoping to isolate Weir to learn his style, and you're somewhat new to guitar, go as far back in time as you can, and focus on his full chord strums, his filling in the void around Jerry.

By learning his old style, you'll "round out" your own style and follow in his footsteps, become "aged' in rhythm guitar similar to him, and understand his "motivations" as you, yourself, age with your "motivations."

Trying to learn Weir's recent work, without putting in the time to see how he has gotten there, will leave you always wondering how he comes up with his ideas, and your own style will suffer because you haven't put in the time, yourself.

It's a long strange trip, but oh so rewarding if you stay the course. It comes piece by piece, and usually only to those who have the "calling."
That's actually a really good point and I've never thought that way before but makes perfect sense. Do you know of a particular show that is good for this?
 #163246  by old man down
 Wed Nov 07, 2018 6:43 am
For Weir’s early stuff, I’m referring to the early 1970’s.

Just about anything off of Skull & Roses: Bertha, MAMU, Johnny B. Goode., NFA/GDTRFB; perhaps their most solid album put out by them, ever, to show their “live" impact.

From it you see Weir’s rhythm not just being a strumming of guitar, but instead as careful and deliberate layering of chords, with little swishes at the ends of stanzas to bring things to the top of the head again for the next round of layering. It’s genius stuff, and punches up Jerry’s lead notes. You can see how they really were starting to like the way each other played, how they each held their own with no slouching whatsoever, and Weir would have full chord strokes, and many more than you might imagine: they blend in and tend to go unnoticed… but they’re there, filling the “sound” so that there is real power to everything. If there are lulls, they are, without question, completely intended to add depth.

Europe ’72, its collection of songs, is a natural progression from S&R. Weir’s suspended 4ths on the secondary verses of Jack Straw, and the whole of the chords mosaic-layout of the song in general, show an evolution of how they could go deeper into the colorings of the moods they’d create. The raw power of Trucking’. China Cat/Rider. The easy feel of Brown Eyed Women because of the relaxed chord strokes. So much to glean from this album.

Ace has some real gems. Playing in the Band should be studied relentlessly; it’s a masterpiece of studio exposition. Unbelievable. (and compare its rendition, and evolution, to that of S&R) Cassidy is an understated work of art; there’s a perceived “skip,” like a skip on a record, imbued within it when it crescendos; try to duplicate that.

Notice that these are all officially released albums; you won’t be encumbered with their performance mistakes: the mistakes have been edited out.

When you really get up to speed, go for a ’76 "live" version of Dancing in the Streets; just figuring out what Weir’s chords up the neck actually "exist as" will humble you. Get a version of that to shine for your own satisfaction and you’ve probably made the grade.
handyandy liked this
 #163254  by 8-6-71 for me
 Wed Nov 07, 2018 5:58 pm
handyandy wrote:
Mon Nov 05, 2018 1:32 pm
How can I use Audacity or similar software to isolate Bobby's guitar track?
Here it is from November 72. Basically only Jerry and Bob recorded and for most songs each is panned hard left and hard right.

https://archive.org/details/gd72-11-12. ... sbeok.shnf

I used this to learn Me & My Uncle (Jer part) in complete isolation. You can use Transcribe! to slow it down and repeat sections as well.
strumminsix liked this